Just a Note to My Followers

I’m doing my best.

I started my day with joy and vigor. Why? It was the anticipation of finally having time to participate in my favorite pastime, writing about current events. I know it’s a weird pastime … but it’s me.

However, there’s a problem. The news cycle happens so fast that, try as I may, it’s simply impossible for me to keep up. I have to work 40 hours a week and by the time I can get to the keyboard, what was news yesterday, is not only old today, it’s forgotten.  

Part of the problem lies in the sheer number of screw-ups that Joe Biden is capable of making.

The only thing Biden does well is fail. Interestingly, Biden doesn’t seem to fail at failing.

Hmmm. Sounds like the subject of a future post.

Anyway, my apologies if my posts seem to be playing catch-up with the headlines. Like I said, I’m doing my best.

PS – Today’s post was supposed to be about Biden’s release of SPR oil. I’ll get to it soon. In the meantime, there’s my next post.

One Space or Two, Too Spacey Today

I’m not sure why this is an issue but I hear other writers ask about it all the time, so here it is again. Should there be one space after a period or two? Ugh . . .

Look, years ago there used to be a thing called a typewriter. It came in two versions, manual or electric. The manual had levered keys that when pressed hard enough, would swing an arm with a letter (lowercase and uppercase) engraved at the end of it. The face of the engraving would strike an ink ribbon and then the paper, leaving a printed letter. Pressing the shift key at the same time as you pressed the letter key, gave you uppercase letters, otherwise you got lowercase. It was always the same font and always the same spacing.

Electric typewriters were a major improvement and gave you soft touch keys with no levered swing arms. There were two options that I know of, print ball or print wheel, depending on the model. The benefit here was that you could change fonts by changing the ball or wheel, but spacing was pretty much fixed.

There’s a common theme here . . . fixed spacing and it’s the reason standard practice at the time was to put two spaces after a period. It not only helped to delineate sentences, it kind of looked better too. By the way, I’d like to point out that this is all information I gleaned from the musings of ancient wordsmiths. I for one, will never admit to having seen such a device in person or god forbid, using one—eh-hem, eh-hem, eh-hem.

Okay, history lesson over. Today we use computers, laser printers, and word-processing programs that offer more fonts and spacing options than we as writers, will ever need. Double-spacing after a period in no longer required because word processors already compensate by automatically adjusting proportions. Throw in some word wrapping and justification, and Bob’s your uncle. I’ve always wanted to use that phrase, hope I did it right. Hey, does anyone out there know what the hell Bob’s your uncle really means, and where it originated?

The long and short of it is this, no double spacing after a period. Period. Don’t believe me? Just pick up a book, look inside, and see for yourself. D’oh!

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“Brothers,” Free through 11/02/14

There was a time in my life when I worked as a salesperson. First, in-store retail sales and after reaching a level of success there, outside sales. Back then, if you worked for Sears and you made it to the appliance department—you reached the top. The only place you could go to earn more money as a commissioned salesperson was outside sales. Unfortunately, those positions were few and far between. Basically, someone had to die or retire before you had a chance of getting one of those jobs.

Two years after I started selling appliances, someone decided to retire from Sears Heating and Cooling. Guess what, I got the job. And if I didn’t have designs on becoming a writer, or Kmart didn’t buyout Sears and destroy the outside-sales department, I’d probably still be working there. The people were great, they were all highly trained professionals, and we all made good money . . . including Sears.

Why do I bring all this up? Well, there’s one golden rule of sales that all good salespeople know but only the experienced ever follow through on. When you’re on a roll, don’t stop, always ride it out to the end. Inexperienced salespeople always lose track of this rule especially after they make a big sale. The worst thing you can do for your wallet is to quit when you’re hot and start celebrating too soon. The ride will end on its own, no need to cut it short, get back in there and close another. If you don’t, someone else will.

What’s the connection? As a promotional tool, “Brothers” is doing better than I anticipated. True, I’d like to sell books to as many readers as possibly for as much money as I can get. But money has never been my prime motivation for writing. Readers were, and still are; that’s why all my books are reasonably priced. Let’s face it, if wealth is your only motivation, you probably have a better chance of striking it rich in Vegas, and no, I haven’t run a statistical analysis . . . I’m just saying.

So, to sum it up, “Brothers” is getting out and touching people—no sense in stopping now.

Thanks to all of you.

father, son, physical, disability, cat million, dollar, house, car, bills, moral, dilemma brother, fraternity, college, roommates, teammates, friend women, career, family, power, girlfriend BookCoverImage SJ&M

Hi guys,

I’ve had a request from a fan. Yep! I got a few. He asked if I would extend the free promotion on “Brothers.” Originally, I was only going to do the two-day deal, but for my 2.63 fans and approximately 50 followers of this blog, I’ve extended the promo one more day. I might extend it through the weekend . . . probably not, we’ll see.

I know, it’s awfully magnanimous and benevolent of me, but I’m generous and kind (for those in Rio Linda) like that.

Thanks all.

 father, son, physical, disability, cat million, dollar, house, car, bills, moral, dilemma brother, fraternity, college, roommates, teammates, friend women, career, family, power, girlfriend BookCoverImage SJ&M